Hanky Code: Its Importance in Gay Culture

by Corey Wesley February 19, 2019

Think of a day when there were no cell phones, no Grindr or Jack'd. How did gay men find ways to identify other like-minded individuals?

The handkerchief code, which is also called the Hanky Code or the bandana code or flagging, is a color-coded system used by gay male casual-sex seekers and the BDSM sexual fetish community. Hanky colors indicate the form of sexual activities the individual seeks and the pocket location indicates if they’re dominant / top (left) or submissive / bottom (right). This code was commonly used during the 1970s by gay and bisexual men and progressed from there to include orientations and genders.

The Truth about the Handy Code and Its Importance in Gay Culture
The Hanky Code is the traditional type of signaling to others your sexual preferences and interests. Gay men used this particular code to communicate with one another in the often distracting and noisy environment of the gay bars. Though not as commonly used today it is a crucial resource and is, among those who know, a good conversation starter.

The Hanky Code is not only classic but a vital part of gay culture. While you may not be interested in wearing a hanky in your back pocket, Kinkster NYC has updated the Hanky Code so you can share your preferences in new and different ways. Our Hanky Code Pillow will definitely add some character to any space and coming soon we'll have iPhone covers and mugs.





Corey Wesley
Corey Wesley

Author

Corey Wesley is the founder of Kinkster (NYC), Kinkster MAG, and VP of Digital Brand Development and Marketing at BlackOutEndeavors LLC.


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